Having A Sense of Humor in Bad Situations

I have always had a sense of humor that people could appreciate. Witty, sharp, logical, smart. And it was only after I had suffered brain cancer that I had the courage to display this great sense of humor publicly with more than just close friends and family. I would often look at my situation, whatever it may be, no matter how bad it made me feel, and think something funny about it. This is a string of personal stories that will show you how humor can be used at anytime, and make yourself happier.

I was getting an MRI, for the twelfth time after going inside this machine so many times I could tell you every possible noise that took place in the machine. I started wondering if they offer any benefits to repeat customers. So I went into the MRI room and told the technician, “I only have to go in one more time before I get a free examination.” I pulled out a card with twelve hole punches in it, reminiscent of somesort of Subway Club card, where if you buy a certain amount of subs, you would get a free sub.

I was going through my radiation treatment for thirty days, as was persecribed and the first fifteen days was a general radiation, but the second fifteen days was this very precise radition table, where the table moved and the laser beam moved in all directions. My body went up, down, around in circles. I got off for the first time and said, “Boy, I thought this was a treatment, not a ride. It’s kind of like the Scrambler, isn’t it?”

At one point, and this was relatively soon into the radiation, I got an eyepatch from my aunt. My eyes were not following each other, probably because of the swelling, and she bought me an eyepatch to help me see things clearer without double vision. I was in a lot of pain, but I still managed to say, “Arrr!” I had a good laugh about it, and it got me through the day.

I am not sure if someone thought of this quote or if it is my own creation of pure magic but here it goes, “Life is rought, so you had better develop a sense of humor. If not, you might now get out alive.” Although none of us get out alive anyway. We all end up dead at the end. I have heard comedians joke about suicide pretty well, and it was hilarious. Joking about cancer is something I do on a regular basis, but more on a personal me basis…”I don’t know if I’ve told you before, but I suffer from short term memory loss after my operation. I don’t know if I’ve told you before, but I suffer from…” “I can’t look up at all. I guess I can never date a woman taller than me.”

So I guess all I have left to say is that no matter how bad things get, no matter how awful your life seems, you can always take the time to joke about it, add some humor to the situation, and you will most likely feel better about it. Even when I get really frustrated, like if I am filling out the dreaded FAFSA, and the questions are so confusing they drive me insane, I can still take a time to laugh about how absurd it is we have to fill this nonsense out in the first place. Let’s not forget doing my taxes, got to fill out my 10-40, W-2, and my WD-40. Have a nice day.
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11 thoughts on “Having A Sense of Humor in Bad Situations

  1. Pingback: Having a Sense of Humor in Bad Situations « Comedy and Humor Blog

  2. Back during my undergraduate university days, I participated in a paid research study. This required that I undergo a PET scan and MRI after having accepted an injection of radioactive carbon 13 isotopes. I read about the procedure and felt it was safe enough. I recall closing my eyes during the MRI experience and imagining that Arnold Schwartzeneggar was forcefully hammering shingles onto the roof of my house. I also recall the MRI technician had a fabulous sense of humor. No wonder you brought out your “hole-punched card” to demonstrate you’d earned a free ride through the slithery tube. If you had really been generous, you could’ve offered that free rise to the technician and offered to operate the machine yourself! Nurturing a sense of humor is a choice. It has the power to enrich our lives and enables us to see benefits in giving of ourselves.

  3. Back during my undergraduate university days, I participated in a paid research study. This required that I undergo a PET scan and MRI after having accepted an injection of radioactive carbon 13 isotopes. I read about the procedure and felt it was safe enough. I recall closing my eyes during the MRI experience and imagining that Arnold Schwartzeneggar was forcefully hammering shingles onto the roof of my house. I also recall the MRI technician had a fabulous sense of humor. No wonder you brought out your “hole-punched card” to demonstrate you’d earned a free ride through the slithery tube. If you had really been generous, you could’ve offered that free ride to the technician and offered to operate the machine yourself! Nurturing a sense of humor is a choice. It has the power to enrich our lives and enables us to see benefits in giving of ourselves.

  4. I think it’s true… laughter is the best medicine. Upon checkins for lab work, Dr.’s appointments and MRI’s I have often asked for the “frequent flier” discount.

    Even on the table, moments before being put under… I asked my anesthesiologist… “Is my tie straight?” Now I don’t know if it was just becuase I couldn’t see anyone’s face (were they smiling or not???) under those surgical masks, or the fact I just wasn’t that funny. I guess it didn’t really matter as I was ultimately just trying to keep my game face on.

    After feeling like I’d managed to climb Mt. Everest, I recently have hit another small hurdle and was referred by someone else to your blog. I like your attitude and perspective. Thanks for the reminder!

  5. Humor is a gift – to receive and to give. Thank you all for your posts. I do have a question about a joke – it is a longish story about delivering bad news – the only part I remember is the phrase “the cat’s on the roof” . This phrase comes toward the end of the joke where you are trying to deliver news , say, of someone’s death. I wish I had the whole story because I have no context for saying “the cats on the roof” as a preamble for delivering bad news (of any sort) which I have to do quite often (in non-medical circumstances may I stress).

    Anyone know of this story?

    Many thanks
    Kyczy

  6. I’m very interested in topics like that, but this one sounds especially truthful, and I really trust the source where it came from. Sooner or later it was going to come out and it finally did!

  7. Nice information there! I just thought of to become your regular reader but the problem is your site doesn’t seem compatible /friendly when it show in KMeleon browser which I use regularly other than internet explorer, hope you can get it fix soon, thanks in advance.

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  10. Incredibly happy I came across this on a random search =) So many people think I’m crazy because even when terrible things happen there’s usually something I find that makes me laugh. It’s not that I enjoy bad things, it’s just that I can find the humor in them. For example, when I first started dating my boyfriend he completely totaled my car. It had only been a day that we were together, and he was ready to burst into tears while I was sitting passenger laughing my ass off. I later asked him what else he was planning to do to celebrate our first day together. He was extremely relieved that I wasn’t upset. =)

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